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Pictures from Towneley Hall’s Woodland Festival

September 14, 2009
Members of the sealed knot loading up cannon in front of Towneley Hall

Members of the sealed knot loading up cannon in front of Towneley Hall

Cannon loaded and fired

Cannon loaded and fired

Muskets at the ready-fire

Muskets at the ready-fire

Intrigued by the medieval harpist

Intrigued by the medieval harpist

The spirit of the Woodland

The spirit of the Woodland

Photo of the day-Morecambe Bay

September 14, 2009
Morecambe Bay

Morecambe Bay

Lancashire hosts the tour of Britain

September 10, 2009

For fans of cycling,make a date in your diaries for the 15th September when the fourth stage of the Tour of Britain arrives in Lancashire.

Blackpool is the start and end of the stage,kicking off at 10.15 in the morning at Stanley Park and finishing at the Sandcastle at 1.50.

In between there are two sprints at Cockerham and Claughton before the riders enter the Forest of Bowland for three climbs at Tatham and Waddington Fells and the Cross of Greet

Visit the Sun Inn at Lancaster

September 8, 2009

The Sun in Lancaster is featured in the Guardian’s 10 urban pubs that could be in the countryside.

It describes

A town centre pub with a country feel, with exposed brick work, wood panels, beams, a 300-year-old oak door, open fireplaces and a well – the latter suggests brewing may have taken place here centuries ago. Food and accommodation are recommended while the beer range is superb. The Sun is the main outlet for the local Lancaster Brewery and offers the full range of Amber, Blonde, Black and Red along with Thwaite’s Wainwright from Blackburn and four regular guest beers. There’s also a good selection of Belgian beers and malt whiskies. There’s an outside heated area for nicotineys.

Situated within Lancaster’s Conservation Area,and five minutes walk from the train station,The bar offers eight cask ales, over a dozen wines by the glass, fifty bottled beers, an excellent whisky/port/brandy selection and superb lunches.

Remembering the Delph Donkey

September 8, 2009

Whilst researching over the weekend I came across this description of a pre war trip along the Delph Donkey to Oldham’s Tommy field Market

It is written by Wilfred Ashton and appears in his book,Saddle-worth Miscellany

The journey was as exciting as the road to Samarkland.To an observant eight year old,the trip on the now legendary Delph donkey took exactly 20 minutes.
After chuffing out of Greenfield station,attended by steaming plumes of white smoke through the elite district of Grasscroft,we were suddenly hurled into a long tunnel.

My eyes used to open in wonderment as the train pitched its way along the swirling acrid smells of stale engine detritus finally emerging at a terrific speed into the sunshine of the Grotton Valley.
Thence forwards to Lees station where senior porters in those days a huge moustache stained with tobacco and beer and who took their job very seriously indeed.

As the train moved forwards to Glodwick Road,I was always glad to see his back as he reminded me of a picture I had of fierce Pathans.
Glodwick was the nadir of what a locality should resemble when it was raining hard it looked far worse.

The Delph donkey was a now ledgendary line opening inn1849 which ran between Delph and Oldham.It closed to passengers in 1955 and to freight eight years later.Part of the line is now used as a walkway.

The donkey name was rumoured to have come about because the original trains were pulled by horses although this is highly unlikely.

Coniston Walking festival

September 6, 2009

The last weekend of September sees Coniston’s walking festival.

Taking place on the 25th-27th September and marketed as a walking festival with a difference,this years event will introduce three well known characters & patrons of fell walking.

The first is local lad- Leo Houlding who will be leading an extreme walk and showing a great film over the weekend. The second is a British legend and the first British Lady to reach the summit of Mount Everest, Rebecca Stephens will be leading two walks & showing a great film over the festival event. The final patron is locally employed- Richard Leafe who is currently the Chief Executive of the Lake District National Park Authority.

Included amongst the walks,a high level circuit of Coniston Old Man,the Yewdale & Tilberthwaite Valleys Tour,aA long beautiful walk in some of the area’s most scenic and secluded spots and a cruise on the steam yacht Gondola and guided walk to the famous Victorian beauty spot.

Walks are graded and all guides are asked to go at the speed of the slowest walker within their group.

Full a full list of events and details of how to book click HERE

Liverpool’s Irish festival

September 6, 2009

October sees Liverpool’s Irish festival return to the city.

Running from the 19th to the end of the month,the seventh Festival celebrates the links between the city and Ireland.

The full list of events is here but amongst the highlights a heritage walking tour conducted by local historians, Greg Quiery and Dr Ian McKeane, featuring stories on O’Connell, Parnell, Bessie Braddock and Dandy Pat some of the colourful characters of the past.

An all star concert featuring Chris Boland, John Murphy, Fiona McConnell, and Liam Murphy as well as traditional Irish music at Peter Kavanagh’s, Egerton Street,The Casa, Hope Street and Peter Kavanagh’s, Egerton Street.

There will also be a giant ceili on Sunday 20 September to kick off the festival launch

The city’s links to Ireland go back a long way.The city is 65 miles closer to Dublin than it is to London.

During the 19th century,Liverpool was the centre of Irish immigration as people fled the famine.In 1847 alone, 300,000 Irish refugees came to Liverpool to leave the famine behind,crossing for just six pence on the so called “coffin ships”.It was estimated that 25 per cent of the popultaion was of Irish decent by the middle of the century.